Halcian Pierre
I joyfully rediscovered my love for colour. Colour became – and is – my mission, and each painting I do is my duty to capture it and make is shout.

Halcian Pierre describes herself as a versatile Caribbean neo pop artist. She expresses herself as a Painter, using acrylic and ink, Writer, Editor and Voiceover Talent. After a few years away from the Art scene, Halcian is back and bursting with colour!! Here's her 20 shades.

1. How do you define creativity and what does it mean to you? 

For me, creativity is a gift and a valuable commodity, and it can manifest itself through different types of expression, like dance, fashion, photography, design, etc. That’s why many skilled (and multi skilled) people exist among us.

2. How much of your creative ability do you think is innate? Or is your creativity a skill that you have developed?

It’s a little of both, actually. I remember whenever my granny would knead flour, I’d pinch off little pieces of it and make little animals. Or take scraps of cloth from whenever she was sewing and knotting them up to make my own dolls. Getting older meant learning techniques and formulas and other things art-wise, so creative growth is always a process of development throughout life.

3. When did you realize that you wanted to express your creativity? Was it encouraged by others (e.g., parents)?

I was always pretty expressive and precocious in the beginning. My primary education was in a private school and they encouraged everything, poetry, drawing, etc, and I loved it all. The only issue was money. Granny took care of me on her pension and whatever Mummy could send from the USA to pay for school. My sweet, ever practical Granny thought of art as an expense and wanted me to do other things. But not Mummy. She loved the fact that I could draw and would always sneak a drawing book, or a colouring book and crayons in the packages she sent us.

4. What is your standard for evaluating your own creative work and the works of other people? Do you think that monetary rewards can be compatible with creativity in general? Are monetary rewards relevant to your own work?

I am still learning and evaluating myself as I go along and having those ‘eureka’ moments when I draw or use my acrylics. I don’t like comparisons, though. I am me and I paint how I paint. Monetary rewards are relevant to everything one does. Creating art takes time and energy, and materials have to be bought in order to do so. So yes.

in our plural society you’re going to see all kinds of influences and representations. I think that makes our art 1000 times richer and bolder.

5. Do you think your own perception and evaluation of your creative endeavors are influenced by the views of other people? What role do you think the culture that you live in plays in your creative efforts?

Culturally, we can’t hide that we’re Trinbagonian and part of the Caribbean, and in our plural society you’re going to see all kinds of influences and representations. I think that makes our art 1000 times richer and bolder. We stand out, and proudly so.

6. What do you do when you experience a creative block?

Before, it used to make me fret, but now I leave it alone and go do something else.

7. How do you make the leap from a "Spark" in your head to the action you produce?

Creative sparks are always flying with me, lol! That spark sometimes becomes a huge explosion that starts a fire, and I have to stop whatever I’m doing to either write it down or doodle it to “put the fire out” and get back to whatever I was doing.

I have OCD so saying ‘rituals’ to me is like, my ‘norm’.

8. Do you have any special rituals that you do in order to achieve your creative goals? 

I have OCD so saying ‘rituals’ to me is like, my ‘norm’. But creatively, I just play certain songs and sometimes listen to ambient sounds to help put me in a calm, receptive state.

9. Has your creativity changed stylistically as you have matured? If it has changed, please explain how?

I know my creative expression changed from what it used to be a couple decades ago. Back then, I did more pencil drawings, and I favoured black and white and colour work, and due to various circumstances I eventually withdrew from doing art for quite some time. I started painting again in December 2013 – thanks to my daughter – and I joyfully rediscovered my love for colour. Colour became – and is – my mission, and each painting I do is my duty to capture it and make is shout.

10. What has been the greatest sacrifice that you have made for your craft?

Sleep. (Laughter) Trust me, I’m still repaying my sleep debts.

it’s all about having faith in my God and seeking enlightenment and understanding

11. Who or what has helped you to persevere and not quit?

Since re-joining the art world, it’s all about having faith in my God and seeking enlightenment and understanding, and I’m grateful to every single person that supported my efforts. Whenever somebody says they love my work or want to purchase a painting, I feel so much joy. That right there encourages me to do even more. Then there's my family and close circle of friends and coworkers that are also friends. They are on my home team and are proud of me. My one area of sadness is that my mom and granny are no longer here, but through them, I also persevere.

self acceptance - that acknowledgement of your abilities and knowing who your are, what you stand for and knowing your purpose - that’s of even greater importance.

12. Do you believe that it is important to be accepted by others as being creative or is just doing what you love to do enough to justify your work?

Acceptance by others is cool and all, but self acceptance - that acknowledgement of your abilities and knowing who your are, what you stand for and knowing your purpose - that's of even greater importance.

13. Has rejection ever affected your creative process?

It has tripped me up on occasion, and when it happens I go through this ‘rewind, pause and analyse’ phase. After that I’m able to process and move forward with a new understanding.

14. Looking at what you have created in the past, would you change anything today? Why or why not?

Never. They are there for posterity and I am glad I can look back at the early work and see where I was then and enjoy and appreciate where I am now.

This wasn’t their journey or their path. It was mine...

15. Have you ever doubted your talent? If so, how did you work through your doubt?

Well, I've never doubted my talent(s), but I’ve experienced interactions with a few people in the past that tried hard to make me feel less than I was, or that I wasn’t capable. Naïvely, I held myself back, which wasn't the right thing to do. It took me a while to release that. This wasn't their journey or their path. It was mine and I had to navigate and dictate my steps how I saw fit.

16. What piece of work are you most proud of? Why? 

My “Yuh is a True Trini if…” cartoon from back in the late 90s to early 2000s. It was the series that established me as one of the first women to have a weekly cartoon in a local newspaper, and it was based on a website called Caribbean Chile, done by Ilka Hilton Clarke, a wonderful lady. I was highlighted in the first issue of Generation Lion because of it; I still have that copy.

17. Have you helped or mentored anyone else? Is there someone that you see (name drop) that you would like to Mentor? 

Hmmm… I’ve mentored a few people over the years, but oddly enough, not as an artist, but as an Editor and Writer (my day job). I do have this dream of someday becoming an art therapist and working with troubled adults and children, or teaching art at a school for special students.

18. To a young Creative emerging in your field, what advice would you impart unto them?

I’d tell them to have a back-up plan, because the road to success isn’t always smooth or straight. Being gifted isn’t always enough as the stakes keep getting higher and the world keeps changing. So keep your eyes and ears open. Beware of the haters and be open to learning and adapting to the changing times. Most importantly, keep the dream alive, work towards it, and keep the faith that it will come true.

19. What would you most like to be remembered for?

Every artistic endeavour I’ve ever been involved in, from my writing to my acting and (most especially), my paintings.

20. If you were a crayon, what would be the name of your colour?

Five-finger orange hue. (Huge grin.)

 

Thanks to Halcian for sharing her thoughts and work with us. Interested in Halcian's work? You can find her online via Facebook, TumblrInstagram and Twitter.

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